The mind… fear… love… healing… miracle…

The mind

Mental health can be very simple. You are not crazy; nobody is. Nothing is irrational once all the facts are known. Healing merely requires learning how — and then doing it. All dysfunction, explored, points to a common source: fear.

You have but two emotions: love and fear.
All healing is essentially the release from fear.

What is fear?

Fear is the stress, tension and tightness that grips us when we think we are in danger — we might feel angry, sorrowful, grief-stricken. In short, fear is everything we experience when we are not in the awareness of love’s presence. Fear distracts us from love. Fear is everything we’d rather ignore, but it seems to keep surfacing until we give it the attention it is calling for. Continue reading The mind… fear… love… healing… miracle…

For many women, a V-section can be as traumatic as a C-section

by Kathryn Lane Berkowitz

Did you know that for many women, a vaginal birth with an episiotomy can be just as traumatic and painful as birth with a cesarean ? It’s true. The birth of my oldest child, who weighed on 5lbs and 5 oz was delivered via a mediolateral episiotomy and forceps. It was extremely painful. I refer to that birth as my “V-section” because that’s how it felt to me. I felt sliced and diced. And I was!

I had many, many stitches that itched and burned and nothing made it go away. This continued for several weeks. I was breastfeeding and it was all I could do to turn over in the bed without pain so intense that it made me nauseated and faint feeling. I had to have someone “spot” me every time I got up to use the bathroom because I was afraid I would faint. I was completely incapacitated.

In case you are unfamiliar with the term “episiotomy”, here is some information, and illustrations: Continue reading For many women, a V-section can be as traumatic as a C-section

Who is Auntie Patricia?

Observation constitutes the foundation of every science.
Charles Sanders Pierce

Auntie Patricia is a detective, a scientist, a lady who wears many hats. She has delved deeply into several areas of life because something in her loves to solve mysteries … Who are we?… What are we? … What makes us tick? … Why are we the way we are? … Why are things the way they are? … What is the point of life? … Is there a purpose?

Well, since Auntie Patricia is writing this, she might as well write in the first person…

In my work as a clinical hypnotherapist, I do not hypnotize people, since most or all of us are already living in a deep trance of fear and forgetfulness; rather, I de-hypnotize people. I wake them up from their walking trances. Continue reading Who is Auntie Patricia?

Returning soldiers face new enemies – PTSD & TBI

From National Public Radio -- September 4, 2010 -- Listen to the audio and read the transcript at NPR.

More than seven years after U.S. troops first invaded Iraq on March 20, 2003, President Obama addressed the nation on Tuesday to commemorate the official end of the Iraq War. However, the legacy of one of America’s longest combat missions will continue to affect the thousands of troops who came home suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Continue reading Returning soldiers face new enemies – PTSD & TBI

The emotional scars of Cesarean birth

by Nicette Jukelevics, author of
Understanding the Dangers of Cesarean Birth:
Making Informed Decisions

at www.DangersOfCesareanBirth.com

For years researchers have largely focused on the technical aspects and “appropriate” rate of cesarean section: the surgical procedure. However, birth by cesarean can have powerful psychological effects on women and their ability to adjust to motherhood.

A woman’s experience of her cesarean birth and her perceptions of the event, are influenced by multiple complex factors: The reason for which the cesarean was performed, her cultural values, her beliefs and anticipations of the birth, possible traumatic events in her life, available social support, and her personal sense of control, are only a few (Cummings, 1988; Cranley, 1983; Marut and Mercer, 1979; Sheppard-McLain1985).

Many women recover fully physically and emotionally from a cesarean birth, others do not. Little attention has been paid to the psychological impact that a surgical birth may have on women’s emotional well being. Their personal experiences have been at times trivialized, misunderstood, or ignored by the medical community.

That birth by cesarean can have an adverse psychological impact on some mothers was already a concern in the early 1980’s as the cesarean rate in the United States was climbing rapidly (Lipson and Tilden, 1980). Anecdotal reports and personal testimonies have helped to increase awareness of the negative psychological repercussions that some women experience following a cesarean birth. (Baptisti-Richards 1988; Madsen, 1994;Pertson and Mehl, 1985; Wainer-Cohen and Estner 1983).

Research suggests that the negative psychosocial effects of cesareans can be significant and far-reaching for some women (Mutryn, 1993). Several reports also indicate that a cesarean birth, especially one that was not anticipated, can put some women at increased risk for depression and post-traumatic stress. Continue reading The emotional scars of Cesarean birth

William Shakespeare – Sonnet 146

Poor soul, the center of my sinful earth,
[…] these rebel powers that thee array;
Why dost thou pine within and suffer dearth,
Painting thy outward walls so costly gay?
Why so large cost, having so short a lease,
Dost thou upon thy fading mansion spend?
Shall worms, inheritors of this excess,
Eat up thy charge? is this thy body’s end?
Then soul, live thou upon thy servant’s loss,
And let that pine to aggravate thy store;
Buy terms divine in selling hours of dross;
Within be fed, without be rich no more:
So shalt thou feed on Death, that feeds on men,
And Death once dead, there’s no more dying then.
– William Shakespeare

Pain-free birth

I know three women who had babies at the harvest moon in September 2010. They all successfully home birthed without assistance. One of the women, a beautiful mother of a perfect one-day old baby girl wrote this to me today:

“I find it shocking that a lot of women fear birth. Birth is natural and there are hundreds of women that birthed without the drug advancements lately. I just experienced my second birth – painfree!

“I’m even more amazed at how many people don’t believe that they can have a painfree birth… I don’t think something as beautiful as birthing a precious baby should be painful and I think a lot of that is media hype. Movies and magazines always exaggerate labor & delivery to be this utterly horrible, noisey, tramatic experience.

“I don’t know about other women but I am fairly quite when I birth. I have a few moans here and there when I am pushing naturally but I just meditate through the waves and let my body do its thing. I just channel all my concentration into my body and my baby.”

Please be sure to order a copy of the Birth As We Know It video for your favorite mother-to-be.

This video will ease her fears and prepare her for a very happy, healthy, empowering experience of birth as mothers through the ages have known. In actuality, any cutting at any time of any body carries risks of bleeding and infection. Modern medical intervention rushes the process and forces procedures that women do not want. Interfering with nature’s kind and loving plan can be more dangerous than helpful.

Yet it requires some effort to birth naturally. Years of fears and myths and our own resulting stressful medical birth trauma need to be reversed. Sign up for the *HealingPlace*, above. We heal the body, mind and spirit and help prepare women so that birth can be a wonderful experience for both mother and child.

Circumcision & Human Behavior

The emotional & behavioral effects of circumcision
by George Hill

Psychologists now recognize that male circumcision affects emotions and behavior. This article discusses the impact of male circumcision on human behavior.

Introduction

Medical doctors adopted male circumcision from religious practice into medical practice in England in the 1860s and in the United States in the 1870s. No thought was given to the possible behavioral effects of painful operations that excise important protective erogenous tissue from the male phallus. For example, Gairdner (1949) and Wright (1967), both critics of male neonatal non-therapeutic circumcision, made no mention of any behavioral effects of neonatal circumcision.[1] [2]

The awakening

Other doctors, however, were beginning to express concern about the behavioral effects of male circumcision. Continue reading Circumcision & Human Behavior

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